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Song Played on 14.313 Wins Grammy

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By K5KVN, on the scene

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — A Los Angeles songwriter was thrilled – but totally surprised – when he won a Grammy for an obscure song he wrote two years ago.

The award was announced at a small event the day after the Grammys and was not televised. At the ceremony, Grammy officials said the song had been played more than 2,500 times on 14.313 MHz. The tally came directly from Official Observer reports and complaints from around the amateur radio community.

The songwriter, Eldon Jarvis, has been a struggling instrumental composer for more than 10 years but specializes in what he describes as “songs that annoy people.” He says he was told about winning the award, the first he’s ever won, while eating a microwave pizza at his home.

“I had never heard of ham radio or a radio station called 14.313. Do they play instrumental jazz?” says Jarvis.

He says he has learned a great deal about amateur radio this week and will tap into his new fame by launching a new website at songstoQRMpeople.com.

The award-winning song, as well as various other compositions and musical sound effects can be heard nearly 24/7 on 14.313 MHz.

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Song Played on 14.313 Wins Grammy Reviewed by on . By K5KVN, on the scene BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- A Los Angeles songwriter was thrilled - but totally surprised - when he won a Grammy for an obscure song he wrot By K5KVN, on the scene BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- A Los Angeles songwriter was thrilled - but totally surprised - when he won a Grammy for an obscure song he wrot Rating: 0

Comments (2)

  • KQ2RP

    Officials are now investigating links to an elaborate ‘payola’ scheme related to this song, where operators were forwarded cash to air the song via paypal, implemented through a phony online QSL request system.

  • KA3YAN

    I just don’t understand why the FCC does nothing about these idiots on 14.313. Their signals are so strong that they must have a decent rig, probably pushing legal limit power. It shouldn’t be difficult to triangulate and RDF to the source.

    Why aren’t the local hams “handling” this if the FCC refuses to?

    Poo on QRMers!!!

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